Reading, again

This year has been difficult, and by difficult, I mean it has sucked and promises to continue sucking for a very long time. Because I’m not looking to vent about anything that’s happened, or am I looking for pity, (or feeling the need to answer personal questions), let’s just accept that’s where things are right now and move on. OK? Thanks. (I knew I could count on you.)

With life being so uncooperative, my reading suddenly became non-existent. I’m saw words but I wasn’t really reading. I took some time off. I re-grouped. I stared at my bookshelves. I pondered. I scrolled the books on the Nook. I’d start a book. I’d put the book down. It became a pattern. I’m a reader? Why can’t I read?

*sigh*

Eventually, words made sense again. The stories started to take on a soothing quality. I was no longer stressing over reading. I read slow. I savored. I went to my comfort reads: fantasy and Arthurian legend. I discovered a new series. I’m now reading all those graphic novels on my shelf.

I’ve started to acquire books again. I’m looking forward to new releases by a few favorite authors.

In the next days and weeks, I might even feel like talking about books again.

Silence

You may, or may not, have noticed that I took a bit of a blogging break thanks to life being unexpectedly uncooperative lately. It happens. I’ll be back soon with reviews and updates. For the time being, happy reading.

Review – Of Blood and Honey

Of Blood and Honey by Stina LeichtI put it on my list and then pretty much did nothing about this book until I found it floating around on my Nook one day and decided it was time. Let me tell you, actually, I don’t know how to tell you how amazing this story is. It’s dark, in some ways terrifying, and in others, sort of sweet. The sweet parts are very few and far between and last only a sentence or two but you need them to get you through the darkness of this book. And don’t let my saying this book is dark turn you off; there’s some great reading here.

Liam has never known his father and has no relationship to speak of with his stepfather. His mother, trying to protect him, let’s him believe his father is dead. That doesn’t help matters especially when knowing would be in his favor. Liam’s true father is fey and when the battle between the fey and the fallen gets bloody, Liam is dragged in not knowing, or understanding, what is going on in his life.

Poor Liam. The boy gets picked up and jailed for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, is abused in prison, and can’t get a break outside of it. Mary Kate, the love of his life is his only redemption but even that relationship has it’s limitations and problems. Liam’s father, a man not fully human, has passed along several traits to Liam but he’s ill-equipped to deal with any of it because no one’s told him how to. He can’t get out of anything, and is stuck in more ways than one.

While parts of this story are painful, it’s worth the read. Leicht overlays the political tensions of Ireland in the 1970s with a biblical battle of good and evil with the church taking sides and even condoning killing, believing the fallen angels need to be killed. Liam is protected not only by his mother but the local priest as well, Father Murray, who tries his best to help him. It becomes a tale of good and evil but the lines are incredibly blurry.

I said some of the story was dark and it’s not only the fantasy elements that apply. The prison scenes are rough but do add to the story in an impressively emotional way. Would it be easier to read this story without these parts? Yes. Would the story be the same without these parts? No.

And Blue Skies From Pain is the follow up to Of Blood and Honey in the Fey and the Fallen series. It’s on my list.

Of Blood and Honey

By Stina Leicht

Night Shade Books

ISBN: 9781597802994

 

Scary & Scary

Scary vs. scary might be a better title…

I have two measurements for scary. One is for things that are scary because they are, or can be, real. The other is for things that are scary, but not really scary because they aren’t real.

Exhibit one, the movie The Silence of the Lambs. It’s scary in that this could be real scary way. As in my neighbor could be that crazy guy who abducts people, keeps them in a hole in the basement, every once in a while yelling down the hole, “It puts the lotion on or gets the hose again.” You know? Not that I think any of my neighbors would be capable of something like that. Come to think of it, I don’t know my neighbors that well. No, they wouldn’t… Would they? Now every time I need to leave my house I’m going to stare out the peephole and make sure no one’s in the hall. Way to go me.

Now, the other scary. Exhibit two, the movie Alien. It’s way more fun on the scary meter because it’s not ever going to happen to me. Not ever. Not that being abducted and thrown in a hole would either. (I live in a condo, there are no basements so I’m thoroughly convinced the first scenario can’t happen. See what I did there.) I’m never going to work for a commercial space towing company. I’m not going to hurl through deep space in a machine induced sleep while a computer named Mother drives. I’m not going to wrestle aliens with acid spit. I’m not. I’m good with that. Really good with that.

Is it weird that I picked movies to illustrate my already weird point? No. I don’t think it is.

I’m pretty sure some of you out there are going to have good examples, so tell me you’re scary vs. scary.

Also, I leave you with this. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to go cover every single mirror on the planet.

Review – Above

Above by Isla MorleyWhen I sit down to read a book, I find a comfortable spot because I usually plan to be there for some time. With Above, I never found that comfort zone because I was putting the book down every few chapters. Why? It was such an intense read that I had to walk away but I was only able to stay away for a few minutes and then I was right back into it because I had to know more. If there’s one thing I didn’t expect from this book, it was the intensity.

At sixteen, Blythe Hallowell is a smart girl, not necessarily boy obsessed, but there is one boy she can’t wait to see at the Horse Thieves Picnic. When the boy is called away and doesn’t return, Blythe is hurt. Walking home later, a local man named Dobbs Hordin drives by and tells her that her brother has been hurt. She gets in the car with him, and instead of being the day she met a boy at the picnic, it becomes the day she goes missing from Eudora, Kansas. Dobbs Hordin is a local survivalist and has been preparing a missile silo for the end of days. He takes Blythe to the silo, locking her in with his other gathered possessions, and when the door is locked, her life all but stops.

The first few days and months of her captivity, Blythe focuses solely on getting out. She wants to go home to her family, she wants to see her best friend, and she wants to walk in the sun again. Blythe soon comes to the sad realization that isn’t going to happen and it’s a crushing blow to her mentally. Months pass and she falls slowly into a dark place fueled by loneliness, anger, and despair. After she gives birth to a stillborn daughter, her mental state becomes even more precarious making even her captor nervous.

Seventeen years pass and Blythe, Dobbs, and their son Adam, live out their meager lives in that silo. All Blythe can think about is her son and going above. She never gave up hope that one day she would be able to see sunlight in place of the sickly light that governs their waking hours below. Wanting her son to understand the world above, she tells him stories about what it will be like once they leave. Dobbs, who does come and go during those seventeen years, never tells Blythe or Adam about the outside world. When an unexpected and unplanned event gives Blythe and Adam the chance to leave, they walk into a world they didn’t expect and weren’t prepared for.

I can honestly say I didn’t see the twist coming. I wanted Blythe and Adam to walk out into the sun, admire the flowers and blue sky. I wanted to see them walk to her parents’ home and be welcomed with open arms. After seventeen years of captivity, they walk into a world that neither understands. It’s devastating to not only Blythe and Adam but you as the reader. I’m not one for happy endings, but I thought Blythe deserved something after what she’d been through and she wasn’t going to get it.

There’s something really wonderful about this twist though, and by wonderful I don’t mean good. I like that Morley doesn’t let the reader have the happy ending. I like that she takes everything away and leaves Blythe with nothing. In more than one way, Blythe gets to start over with a clean slate even if she doesn’t see that. While no one forgives Dobbs for anything — and he certainly doesn’t deserve forgiveness — Blythe does come to realize a few things about him that she never would have given thought to if she had still been locked behind concrete walls.

I won’t lie — this is a book you won’t be able to put down. And if you do put it down, you’ll pick it back up in a few minutes because you won’t be able to stay away. Having devoured it in a day, trust me when I say this. Morley delivers a book that will drive you through every possible emotion before you get to the end, and once you get there, your heart will be sore from the beating.

Above

By Isla Morley

Simon and Schuster/Gallery Books

ISBN: 9781476731520

In addition to this blog, I also write reviews for the Bookreporter. You can find my review of Above here.

Review – The Last Page and Black Bottle

I loved The Last Page, which is the first book in this duology about Caliph the reluctant king of Stonehold. (That’s the word the author uses to describe these books so I’m going with it.) The Last Page is a combination of fantasy, science fiction, and a little bit of steampunk. Black Bottle is a bit of the same with a strong end of the world vibe. Since I never did get around to talking about The Last Page when I read it, I’m reviewing the two books as a whole.

The Last Page by Anthony HusoBasic premise of The Last Page: Caliph Howl is the reluctant heir to the throne of the Duchy of Stonehold. At 23, he becomes king and is forced to confront a possible civil war, and every dirty secret held by the Duchy. What he really misses, is his lover, Sena. They met in school and Caliph fell hard for the witch, and while she returns to him, it’s not for love, it’s for his blood. The woman is looking for a book called the Cisrym Ta. This book can destroy the world, and she’s the only one who knows how to open it.

So, The Last Page = awesome. Seriously, read it. Thanks to Elizabeth over at Dark Cargo for pointing this one out one day. It’s a book worth your time.

Basic premise of Black Bottle: Caliph Howl has been raised from the dead by his witch, Sena — or at least that’s what everyone believes. Thanks to this tidbit of gossip, the Duchy of Stonehold has now captured the interest of the rest of the world. When Caliph is invited to speak as part of a delegation, Sena’s action’s may bring about Caliph and Stonehold’s demise.

Black Bottle by Anthony HusoI liked Black Bottle but I didn’t love Black Bottle. The reason is not because it wasn’t The Last Page but because at certain points, I didn’t know where the story was going. It felt a little lost to me. Overall, I think these two books make an epic worth reading and maybe I would have enjoyed the second book more if I had read it closer in the timeline of life to The Last Page. I think my love may have rubbed off on it, but as that didn’t happen, I think I was waiting for the love to arrive in the same magnitude.

This is a dark world that Huso creates. Blood magic, death, monsters, witches, black holes where no life exists. The blood magic is amazing — horrific, painful, and deadly — and as dark as it should be. Sena is the epitome of her order, she knows and understands more than her closest peer, but even she can’t use the magic without being hurt. While not going into it for spoilerific reasons, her transformation throughout the story was interesting. Also, I liked that there are strong female characters in these books but I do wish they weren’t only witches and/or addictive personalities with crazy hallucinations though.

Am I glad I read both books? Yes. Will I recommend them? Yes. Will there be caveats? Probably, especially in regard to Black Bottle, but final word — read them if you’re looking for an epic to keep you company in the cold.

The Last Page

By Anthony Huso

Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC

ISBN: 9781429964869

Black Bottle

By Anthony Huso

Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC

ISBN: 9781429985536

Review – A Burnable Book

A Burnable Book by Bruce HolsingerLondon, 1385, and a supposedly ancient book of poems prophesying the death of England’s newly crowned king, Richard II, is making the rounds. While the book, and its seditious poems, becomes the talk among English high society, John Gower, an English poet and bureaucrat, learns about the book from his friend Geoffrey Chaucer in a shadowy bar when the two meet to talk. Chaucer, in a spot of trouble and looking for help from Gower, asks his friend to find the book saying it will cause him grief if it falls into the wrong hands. Unfortunately, Chaucer fails to mention the most pertinent information, leaving Gower to find out it’s a “burnable book” — a treasonous work that can get one killed for having just seen it let alone asking around about its existence.

Gower knows London inside out with contacts everywhere and he’s not afraid to pay for the information he needs. Knowing little about the book he’s after puts him in the dark, a place he isn’t used to being. When he starts asking about the work, he runs into a wall but he keeps at it becoming increasingly curious, and worried, about what the book contains. What he finds are more questions — none of which can be safely answered.

While the book is discussed secretly in dark palace halls, in the London slums, it falls into the hands of several unknowing individuals who don’t understand how valuable the book is but they know that people will commit murder to get their hands on it. As information about the book makes an unruly circle back to Gower, he finds himself questioning his love for his family, his circle of influence, and why he’s even looking for the book. If Gower finds the book will it stop the death of King Richard II? Are the prophecies true or just rambling notes between lovers?

Holsinger is a first time novelist but he’s no stranger to writing or the medieval world in general. He’s a medieval scholar, and you can tell by the details. He doesn’t overwhelm the reader and does an excellent job bringing the London of 1385 to life. In a few instances, the descriptions are so real you wish you could unread them, especially when the story moves to the slums and the living conditions. Then again, it’s also what brings this story alive and makes it so good.

I have to talk about the characters because it’s an amazing array of individuals. Yes, Geoffrey Chaucer is in this book but he’s not the whole book and I like that he’s a minor character in some ways. John Gower on the other hand is a nice mix of courage, self-assurance, self-doubt, and loathing. I like that he questions himself, his life, and his family. This whole episode with the book changes everything for him and makes him question what he’s doing in London and the life he’s built. By far the most fascinating characters though — the women of the London slums. These women are some of the most interesting in the book, and certainly some of the most devious when it comes to hiding the book and finding it again. The descriptions of slum life take this book from being a nice bit of historical fiction to very accurate descriptions of historical life.

The best part of this book, apart from the characters, is the mystery itself. First, it’s a mystery about a book — what reader doesn’t love that! Second, thanks to the cast of characters, the book passes through so many hands that even the people who know the truth about the book don’t know what’s happening. In the interest of preserving the mystery, I’ll stop there but think tangled web and you have a great sketch of this book.

If I’d been asked to write a three word review of this book it would have read — read this book. And that’s my final conclusion — read this book.

A Burnable Book

By Bruce Holsinger

William Morrow

ISBN: 9780062240323